Tag Archives: 72 hour kit

72 hour kit information updated

I received an email from a viewer the other day pointing out that there were some bad links on my Emergency Preparedness page on 72-hour kits over at MormonShare.com.  I wrote that article what seems like a hundred years ago and haven’t thought about it in ages.  It was good to get some feedback and a reminder to keep updating some of these old bad links.

Or webmasters could do the right thing and include legacy links for their sites…..

Sigh.

Even I’m bad to forget to updates links as the old URLs change, though I have worked over the years to correct them as someone points them out to me.  If you see a bad link, please let me know.  I try to update things as I have time.

LDS Handout

Jenny’s 1500/2000/2500 Calorie 72 hour Kit Menus

I’ve grown increasingly concerned about the menus frequently created at Enrichment meetings for 72 hour kits consisting of oatmeal, chewing gum, and beef sticks. Read my rant. These low calorie menus fail to meet the dietary needs of individuals in a crisis. I created these menus to meet caloric, protein, and carbohydrate needs for adults and children, male and female, while keeping sodium to a minimum.

I’ve included a price breakdown for each menu and the weight for 1 day’s food for packing purposes. Each menu is for one day’s caloric needs.

I’ve also included pouch only (sort of like a homemade MRE kit, just cheaper) and mixed packaging menus. The mixed packaging menus are usually more balanced than the pouch menus, but can be heavy. The pouch menus are lighter weight but can be lower in carbohydrates, your body’s preferred source of energy. It would probably be wise to create 2 pouch only days and 1 mixed packaging day for your kit.

The items on the menus do not require any cooking or hot water.

I asked my friend, a doctor, to look over the menus (especially the Poor Man’s Menu) and he said they were safe.

Instant grits come in a pouch that’s coated on the inside, so all you have to do is pour water in the pouch and let them sit to prepare them. Water temperature doesn’t matter. Same for oatmeal, but grits taste a lot better than oatmeal when cold. For the mashed potatoes, just add water to the pouch.

If you substitute menu items be sure to compare with the full chart to ensure you’re getting similar amounts of calories, sodium, protein and carbs.

You’ll also need to store 64 ounces (4 lbs) of water per day per person. 64 ounces equals 1/2 gallon or about 2 Liters.

LDS Handout

S.A.F.E. Emergency Preparedness Plan

S.A.F.E. – Simplified And easy Format for Emergencies

This document was shared during a regional welfare training in Virginia, and LaRene O. gave me a copy: “It is to be saved to your hard drive so changes can be made with ease. Once it is filled out, copy it and place inside a water proof bag or laminate and keep in you 72 hour kit, in your wallet, with your important papers, [etc.]”

This document helps you make a plan quickly and update it easily. Includes sections on communications, sheltering in place, transportation, and funds that you might not have considered in your emergency planning.

Completing the document would make a great Family Home Evening activity.

1 page, color, 8.5 x 11 inches.

LDS Handout

LDS Emergency Preparedness Manual

This document is one I found online. It was originally created by the Magna Utah Stake in 1997 and contains a variety of useful preparedness information.

Among the more interesting items are a list of individual, ward, stake, and district responsiblities in an emergency. It also has a map with a possible use of a standard church building in an emergency.

It’s targeted at the Magna Stake, but much of the information is universal, including the information on preparing for earthquakes and winter storms.

This manual is extensively referenced, with a table of contents and index. It’s a very long document — some 84 pages and will take some time to download.

Click on Emergency Preparedness below to find more similar documents.

LDS Handout

LDS Emergency Preparedness Manual – 2

This document is one I received from our Stake Emergency Preparedness Specialist who got it from a neighboring unit. It is based on one originally created by the Bonneville First Ward in Salt Lake City. This version was created for a West Jordan Utah Stake.

It is extremely detailed and has lots of practical information and lists. It even includes a basic first aid guide.

110 pages. Available in PDF or .doc, so that you can edit it yourself to suit your unit’s needs.

***NOTE*** – Download the PDF to view if you’re just looking, because the .doc file is VERY large (22 MB).

Click on Emergency Preparedness below to find other similar documents.

LDS Activity Ideas

72 Hour Kit Contents List

This is the list of 72 hour kit contents for my family of 4. Each of us has our own backpack (I’ve tested to make sure the kids can carry theirs), and we have one big black duffel bag we use for the less essential shared items. I put a copy of the items in each backpack in each bag. I hope this list is of use to some of you!

-Jenny

72-hour kit contents

Black Bag

2 8×10 foot tarps
100 feet nylon rope
1 knife
1 checkers game
1 propane lantern and case
1 propane burner and stand
1 folding shovel
1 axe
120 hour candle
20 pantiliners
1 pouch dessert
4 24 oz water bottles
coffee pot
tube tent and rope
firesticks
Oust air sanitizer
Bug spray
Baby shampoo
Dish soap
Fishing kit
Gatekeeper water filter and flexi-flask

7 year old

Hoodie
Sweatpants
Socks
Underpants
1 emergency blanket
knife, fork, spoon
1 pocket knife
1 folding scissors
1 poncho
3 BrushUps
3 Band-Aids
1 whistle
1 travel sized bar soap
1 terry hand towel
1 carbon filtering dust mask
6 handwarmers
1 box waterproof matches
6 8oz water bottles
3 MRE meals
4 MRE apple dessert
pen
paper
playing cards
1 drink mix

4 year old

Hoodie
Sweatpants
Socks
Underpants
1 emergency blanket
knife, fork, spoon
1 poncho
3 BrushUps
3 Band-Aids
tissue
1 whistle
1 terry hand towel
1 carbon filtering dust mask
6 handwarmers
1 box waterproof matches
3 8oz water bottles
6 cookies
2 MRE meals
3 MRE apple dessert
pen
paper
1
1 drink mix

Adult Male

1 full 72hr MRE kit (6 snacks, 6 desserts, 9 meals) + 4 MRE meals
1 folding saw
1 pr leather work gloves
whistle/mirror/compass/waterproof matches
1 multitool
120 hour candle
6 handwarmers
1 bottle water purification tablets
4 24 oz water bottles
1 8 oz water bottle
1 LED headlamp with 3 AAA batteries, expire 2012
2 mini beaners
1 flint stick
1 solar flashlight radio
1 mechanical pencil
3 scouring pads with soap inside
paper
pen
1 emergency blanket
1 poncho
3 BrushUps
knife, fork, spoon
1 carbon filtering dust mask
4 drink mixes

Adult Female

1 Hygeine kit:
tampons
Chapstick
Q-tips
deodorant
3 BrushUps
2 razors
1 comb
1 bar soap
nail clippers

1 emergency blanket
1 pointy metal nail file
1 whistle/compass/mirror /waterproof matches
4 drink mixes
1 bottle water purification tablets
2 reusable handwarmers
4 handwarmers
1 pr leather work gloves
1 multitool
1 pouch tissue
1 carbon filtering dust mask
1 LED headlamp, with 3 AAA batteries
1 mini can opener
3 scouring pads with soap inside
knife, fork, spoon
travel wet wipes
1 box waterproof matches
$140 cash and some change
3 instant cold packs
4 24 oz water bottles
120 hour candle
1 hand crank flashlight radio
1 full 72 hour MRE supply

1 first aid kit:
first aid instruction book
1 roll waterproof tape
1 .75 oz bottle aloe vera lotion
1 eye wash kit
30 chewable Pepto Bismol tablets, exp 3/07
10 200mg Advil, exp 12/2006
1 3 oz sublock
1 wrist sock
2 pr latex gloves
1 first aid crème
28 hydrocodone tablets, exp 9/06
2 two inch roll gauze
1 scissors
box of bandaids:
bandaid assortment
1 non stick pad
knuckle bandaids
1 bar soap
alcohol wipes
benzalkonium chloride antiseptic wipes
iodine wipes
sting relief pads
ammonia inhalant pads
triple antibiotic ointment
1 ace bandage
1 stick on thermometer
1 tweezers
2 2nd skin burn pads
2 4×4 inch gauze pads
6 2×2 inch gauze pads
1 5×9 pad
1 roll first aid tape

LDS Activity Ideas

72 Hour Bucket Kits

These 72 hour kit lists were emailed to me by Mrs. Haws. Each of these bucket style kits uses the 5 gallon buckets from a hardware store. She uses a special tool called a Gamma Seal Lid to make her pails twist off and waterproof. – Jenny Mrs Haws says the following:

    I have a list of items of a 72 hr. food kit that my husband liked alot better [than the beef jerky kits]. Maybe alot of husbands looked at those small kits in dismay! So we figured out items that we would be willing to eat cold. We used alot of granola bars as well as some chicken, etc. We also made up what I like to call an “L.D.S. Style” bucket, that should be available for all sisters to do. The granola style bucket is expensive and would last longer than 72 hrs. as you will see. The home bottled one is less, but doesn’t include much quick food. I’ve yet to fully combine the best of both styles of buckets, and will continue to change mine around I’m sure, and find a good mixture and get the best of both buckets. We also have one bucket filled with just bottled water. We also have a 2 gal. bucket that we have decided for now, to put in batteries, wash cloth, flashlight, radio, soap etc.

    I include an itemized inventory of the bucket contents for each bucket. The list sits on top, because each bucket may vary just a bit. I also include a personal information sheet. It contains our family members names, ages, mail and physical address, and other extended family members names, addresses and phone numbers. Of course you would have to keep close tabs on this particular paper if you decide to put it in your bucket.

    For those of us with any children or elderly who cannot identify themselves, I would suggest name tags and a pen or marker be included in the buckets or quickly at hand to write and identify them and who the parents or guardian or other family members are in case of separation.

72 hr. Kit in a Bucket w/ Screw Top Lid

Packed:

1-50 gal. Food grade trash bag, can be used for a variety of things

10 – blue utility paper towels

1-water purification tablet for 1 liter of water

3-quarts, 1 pint bottled water – total amount of individual bottles

3-6.75 oz. Capri Sun Sport drink pouches w/ electrolytes: Berry Ice, Orange, Lemon Lime

1-10 oz. Bottle Dayquil liquid – or medicine that works for you (liquid can be better adjusted/measured for younger children)

1-plastic knife, fork, spoon, salt, pepper napkin pak

4-plastic or metal spoons (I just bought each person a camping fold up knife style fork, knife, spoon combo about $9)

9-strike anywhere matches, or however many you like, in film cannister.

1-mini first aid kit in film cannister: 4 band aids, I Neosporin pkt., I alcohol swab, 2 quarters

1-tube sock w/ bar or liquid body soap, sock because easy to tie to outside of bucket, (unless you put it in with clothes) and you could use the sock as wash cloth.

1-roll toilet paper (use one with aloe in it, it won’t get as fuzzy and deteriorate in storage)

1- flashlight w/ batteries, or crank type

1-firestarter kit w/ waterproof matches (depending where you live or will go, etc.)

1-radio, crank or battery style w/ batteries, for news information

POP TOP VEGGIE & MEAT CANS (willing to eat cold)

2-8.75 oz. Whole corn

2-8.50 oz. Sweet peas

2-7 oz. Ranch style beans

1-7.75 oz. Beans & wieners

1-4.25 oz. Underwood chicken spread

1-8 oz. Jar chicken – home bottled

2-ramen noodles: Oriental & beef (can use just seasoning packets in water for broth if necessary)

1-16 oz. Jar kidney or navy beans – home bottled (with these and salsa and chicken would be like having taco salad)

1-8 oz. Jar red salsa – home made and bottled

1-3.75 oz. Jar wyler’s chicken bouillon, instant granules. Makes 30 cups of broth.

1-pkg. Of misc. seasonings for food: salt, pepper, chili, garlic, or onion powder, as you like.

POP TOP FRUIT CANS

1-8.25 mandarin oranges segments

1-8.50 oz. Sliced pears

2-8.25 oz. Pineapple wedges

2-4 oz. Applesauce cups

1-3.5 oz. Vanilla pudding cup

1-3.5 oz. Orange jello cup

FRUIT SNACKS

1-1.5 oz. Raisin box in zip loc bag to prolong moisture content

2-.9 oz. Welch’s fruit snacks: fruit punch, berries ‘n cherries

2-.5 oz. Florida’s natural fruit juice nuggets: blueberry

8- pieces hard candy

CRACKERS

1-cheese dip & sticks pak

2-.93 oz. Toasty (ritz) & peanut butter crackers

2-.93 oz. Cheese & peanut butter crackers

2-.77 oz. Ritz Snack Mix, pretzels, cheez its, ritz, triscuits combo.

GRANOLA BARS

1-1.3 oz. Quaker breakfast bar, Very Berry Muffin (soft)

1-1.3 oz. Quaker breakfast bar, Apple Crisp (soft)

2-2 oz. Fig Newtons, 2 bars in each pack (soft)

1-1 oz. Great Value Chewy Fruit & Nut Trail granola bar (sticky)

1-1 oz. Great Value Chewy Apple Berry granola bar (sticky)

2-1.2 oz. Nature Valley Sweet & Salty Nut – 1 Peanut, 1 Almond (sticky)

2-1.5 oz. Nature Valley Crunchy – 1 Roasted Almond, 1 Pecan (crunchy)

*ONE SEPARATE BUCKET OF CLOTHING & PERSONAL CARE NEEDS

* ONE SEPARATE BUCKET OF BOTTLED WATER

*ONE SMALL POCKET GAME LIKE DOMINOES, ETC.

**NO ENDORSEMENT OF ANY KIND IS INTENDED, FIND YOUR OWN ITEMS OF PREFERENCE.

**THESE ARE ONLY SUGGESTIONS OF WHAT I HAVE USED. I ITEMIZED IT LIKE I DID SO THAT I WOULD KNOW WHAT I HAD WHEN IT IS TIME TO REPLACE THOSE ITEMS AS WELL AS TO KNOW AT A GLANCE WHAT IS IN THE BUCKET SO I CAN PLAN ACCORDINGLY WHAT TO EAT TO BALANCE OUT FOR A MEAL, AND SO FORTH. THERE IS ALWAYS ROOM FOR IMPROVEMENT, SO ASSESS AND AND RE-WORK THIS PLAN UNTIL IT WORKS BEST FOR YOU. I HAVE CHANGED MINE MANY TIMES. JUST DO SOMETHING!

Mrs. Haws’ Comments
The approximate grand total on this bucket Granola Style bucket, including cost of bucket, screw lid, batteries and about $3 pocket game etc., is in the neighborhood of $68. I was surprised to see how high it was after all was said and done, but the screw lid was $7 more than the standard one, plus cost of bucket, game optional, but it is still high. Really unaffordable for large families, even though very convenient.

So then I started to think of how to knock down cost, and then I thought of the home bottled foods bucket. To get the best of both worlds I would suggest combining the two different styles of bucket plans. Again assess and re-assess to make it work for you. You could always test it too, how happy would your family be if they had to eat out of it for 3 days or so? Test it and then adjust it!

I use an adapter to make the bucket have a screw top lid for ease, no opening tool needed and it is water proof, this adapter costs about $10. It is optional and adds to the overall cost, but convenient for all family members to operate. Weight isn’t too bad, and of course with this much food, it should last you awhile.

The screw top lids are made by The Gamma Seal Lid, using a rubber mallet, you unscrew the top from the bottom ring and hammer on the ring and it’s ready to go. They do come in colors too. Here is the website for them, although I ordered thru a local person here that sells other food items, kind of like Model Team Express if you have ever heard of that before, same price as on the internet, but you don’t have to pay for shipping. You can get them online at Gamma Seal Lids or by calling 1-800-842-6543, I have kept the sticker that comes on the lid in place so I could easily get my hands on the info. Says it fits 3.5 – 7 gal. buckets.

To fit all the items from one list, the major Granola Bar style bucket or Home Bottled bucket, I used standard 5 gal. buckets from the hardware store. For extra accessories like the soap and batteries and such, we decided to use the 2 gal. bucket, again from hardware store. Of course the list I have on the home bottled bucket is what I can get in there as far as jars are concerned, however you could fill in with granola bars, etc,

72 Hour Food Kit Bucket w/ Screw Top Lid – Using Home Bottled Items

Packed:

1-enamel ware cup, 32 oz. w/metal spoon

2-quart jars saltine crackers

1-quart homemade granola

1-8 oz. Peanut butter

3-8 oz. chicken

2-8 oz. white beans

1-8 oz. pinto beans

1-8 oz. kidney beans

1-8 oz. anasazi beans

1-8 oz. tomatoes w/ salt, halved

1-8 oz. red salsa

1-8 oz. sweet potates (potassium, an electrolyte)

1-4 oz. green chile, roasted – Big Jim style or the like

2-8 oz. apple juice

3-8 oz. milk

Misc. spices for flavor – salt, pepper, chili, garlic, or onion powder, etc.

*ONE SEPARATE BUCKET FOR CLOTHING AND PERSONAL NEEDS

*ONE SEPARATE BUCKET FOR BOTTLED WATER

To Bottle Dry Beans

Use dry beans of any size, rinse well and add dry beans to jars, filling the rest of the way up to 1″ from the top of the jar with water. Add salt if you like, not necessary though. Pint and half pint jars can easily be pressured in your small 4 quart pressure cooker, so you can easily bottle the different types of beans. For our altitude, about 7,000 ft., dry beans need to be pressured for about 1 hour to 1 hour 10 min., so if you want to combine pressuring the chicken jars and the beans at the same time, the chicken needs to process for 1 ½ hrs., raw pack, so the beans can go over time and still be fine. The following is a guide to help you figure the measurements of dry beans for the different sizes of jars. Or if you prefer more liquid, reduce the bean measurement by about half, or as you like.

8 oz. jar – 1/3 c. dry beans, any size

16 oz. jar – 2/3 c. dry beans

32 oz. jar – 1 1/3 c. dry beans

All of this can be eaten cold. The beans, crackers, green chile, chicken, salsa and or tomatoes can be combined to make a Mexican style bean salad, (like the frito taco salad). Home bottled corn would be a nice addition.

You can also bottle your favorite quick bread like, banana, zucchini, etc. to put in. Anything from your garden, mix and match to your likings.

Approximate cost:
$20 food
$10 screw on lid
$6 bucket
Total $36

*cost of jars not included

Mrs. Haws’ comments
This is a very basic food bucket. Not included were the paper towels, radio, soap, etc., that can be in another bucket or in with clothing. For your water use a separate bucket so you will have plenty, water can make the difference in how well you do. This is just an idea starter, bottle what your family would use, try it out and make adjustments. Assess and re-assess and make it work for you. DO SOMETHING!

I use an adapter to make the bucket have a screw top lid for ease, no opening tool needed and it is water proof, this adapter costs about $10. It is optional and adds to the overall cost, but convenient for all family members to operate. Weight isn’t too bad, and of course with this much food, it should last you awhile. Chicken is in small bottle so it can be eaten quickly when opened, and the broth from it drank also. How soothing would chicken broth, or any broth be for children and elderly alike?

I knew I had to include some sort of broth style item, even if the water is cold instead of warm, the salt in the broth can help many people with stress, shock, etc. The sweet potatoes are as pure as baby food and very gentle, so can be eaten by babies and elderly, I catch them on sale in the fall for about 25-33 cents a pound and just peel and cube them up and add water and process for the time stated in canning book.

The screw top lids are made by The Gamma Seal Lid, using a rubber mallet, you unscrew the top from the bottom ring and hammer on the ring and it’s ready to go. They do come in colors too. Here is the website for them, although I ordered thru a local person here that sells other food items, kind of like Model Team Express if you have ever heard of that before, same price as on the internet, but you don’t have to pay for shipping. You can get them online at Gamma Seal Lids or by calling 1-800-842-6543, I have kept the sticker that comes on the lid in place so I could easily get my hands on the info. Says it fits 3.5 – 7 gal. buckets.

To fit all the items from one list, the major Granola Bar style bucket or Home Bottled bucket, I used standard 5 gal. buckets from the hardware store. For extra accessories like the soap and batteries and such, we decided to use the 2 gal. bucket, again from hardware store. Of course the list I have on the home bottled bucket is what I can get in there as far as jars are concerned, however you could fill in with granola bars, etc,