yw value color and meanings

does anybody know the meaning for gold, I havve been looking everywhere and came up
with nothing... PLEASE HELP it would be greatly APPRECIATED!

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4 Comments

ctm's picture

Thank You for taking the time

Thank You for taking the time to reply... I was asked to put together a WELCOME PACKET for the new girls that are entering and I came across a paper that was left in a binder that was handed down to me and it had the meaning of the colors... so I wanted to update it. :0)

Miyuki's picture

Here is the definition given

Here is the definition given in the talk by Sister Dalton from the May 2009 Ensign.
Gold is pure. It shines. It is soft, not harsh or brash. It is precious. Gold must be refined. As you live a pure and virtuous life, you will be refined by your life’s experiences, and as you “trust the Lord” and drawer closer to Him, He will “make your hearts as gold.

Jenny Smith's picture

Ardeth G Kapp, who was YW

Ardeth G Kapp, who was YW General President when the "new" values and colors were introduced in 1985, gave the following information on the colors selected for the YW values:

"Ardeth Kapp, a former general Young Women president, says that the colors used to represent the values have no significant religious meaning. They are meant as reminders.

  • " White is symbolic of purity and Faith.
  • Divine Nature seems to suggest creation, the big blue sky, and all that is divine.
  • Individual Worth should be bold and confident. Red fit that feeling.
  • Knowledge is symbolic of green and growing.
  • Choice and Accountability, two values together, is represented by putting two colors together; red and yellow make orange.
  • Good Works brings sunshine, happiness, and light. Yellow seemed to fit.
  • And Integrity is purple, royal and righteous."

Caroline H. Benzley, “134 Years Young!,” New Era, Nov 2003, 24,

http://www.lds.org/ldsorg/v/index.jsp?vgnextoid=024644f8f206c010VgnVCM10...

Here's what Sister Dalton said about gold for virtue:

"Never before has there been a greater need for virtue and purity in the world.

"The value of virtue has been given a symbolic color, like the other values. The color of virtue is gold because gold is pure. It shines. It is soft, not harsh or brash. It is precious. Gold must be refined. As you live a pure and virtuous life, you will be refined by your life's experiences, and as you 'trust in the Lord' (Proverbs 3:5) and draw closer to Him, He will 'make [your] hearts as gold' (Roger Hoffman, "Consider the Lilies")."

Elaine S. Dalton, "Come Let Us Go Up to the Mountain of the Lord," Ensign, May 2009, 120

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